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PC 1320: Failing to Appear on Misdemeanor or Felony Own Recognizance

Legal Definition:

(a) Every person who is charged with or convicted of the commission of a misdemeanor who is released from custody on his or her own recognizance and who in order to evade the process of the court willfully fails to appear as required, is guilty of a misdemeanor. It shall be presumed that a defendant who willfully fails to appear within 14 days of the date assigned for his or her appearance intended to evade the process of the court.

(b) Every person who is charged with or convicted of the commission of a felony who is released from custody on his or her own recognizance and who in order to evade the process of the court willfully fails to appear as required, is guilty of a felony, and upon conviction shall be punished by a fine not exceeding five thousand dollars ($5,000) or by imprisonment pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 1170, or in the county jail for not more than one year, or by both that fine and imprisonment.  It shall be presumed that a defendant who willfully fails to appear within 14 days of the date assigned for his or her appearance intended to evade the process of the court.

To be found guilty under PC 1320 prosecution must prove that you: 1. You are charged with the commission of a felony or a misdemeanor

OR 2. You were convicted of the commission of a felony or a misdemeanor

AND 3. You were released from custody on your own recognizance;

AND 4. In order to evade the process of the court, you willfully failed to appear as required.

What does this mean?

This charge occurs when you were released from custody and given a future date to appear in Court for a misdemeanor or a felony offense. This can happen when you are “cite released” from the jail with a ticket and a future Court Date. You’re required to sign the ticket to agree to appear in court in the future. Failing to do so is another offense, depending on whether you have a felony or misdemeanor charge against you. In addition, if you appear in Court on a criminal case, and a judge agrees to release you from jail without posting a bail bond, and you later fail to appear, this new charge can be added to your case.

Whether your violation under PC 1320 is a misdemeanor or a felony depends on whether the underlying charge, meaning the original case you failed to appear on in Court, as well as your criminal history.

Penalties

A violation under PC 1320(a) is a misdemeanor offense. If you are convicted of this charge, you could be sentenced to up to 180 days in County Jail. You would be required to serve at least 50% of that time in custody.

A violation under PC 1320(b) is a wobbler offense. This means you can be charged under this section as a misdemeanor or as a felony offense. Whether you are charged with a misdemeanor or a felony offense depends on the specific facts of your case as well as your criminal history. If you are convicted under this section as a felony, you could be sentenced to County Prison for upwards of 16 months, 2 or 3 years. You would have to serve at least 50% of that time in custody. If you are convicted under this section as a misdemeanor, you could be sentenced to upwards of one year in County Jail. You would have to serve at least 50% of that time in custody. You would also be subject to fines up to $5000 for a conviction under this section.

Another factor the Court considers is whether or not you have prior failures to appear in the past for that same case or a new one. This could also be a reason for why a Judge revokes your own recognizance status and setting a high bail in your case.

This is not a strike offense under California’s Three Strikes Law. It is also not a Sex Offense requiring Sex Registration under PC 290PC 1320 is not a crime of moral turpitude,  but it could be considered an aggravated felony, so it could directly impact your status in Immigration Court or if you have a professional license.

Common Defenses

  1. Statute of Limitations
  2. Insufficient Evidence
  3. Violation of Rights
  4. Necessity

A defense to this charge could be that you were never given notice of the Court Date. Especially in times, during a pandemic, Court dates move, and Court’s close down. When that happens, and your Court Date moves, you may not know when your next Court Hearing is. If that were to happen, the Court normally sends a notice to your last known address. If you never received that notice, you would be able to argue that you did not willfully disobey a requirement to appear in Court, because you were never told when the new Court date is. This would allow you to argue that there is insufficient evidence to prove you guilty of this charge.

If you have a valid reason or excuse, such as a doctor visit, you can normally avoid this new charge by calling the court or having your attorney appear for you. Speak with your attorney on how best to explain your situation to avoid you receiving a new charge and being subject to stiffer fines and more jail time.

Call Today

Navigating the legal repercussions of a failure to appear in court is a matter that requires skilled legal counsel. Such an instance can not only revoke your “Own Recognizance” (OR) release status but also potentially increase the severity of your sentencing if convicted of both the initial charge and the failure to appear under Penal Code 1320.

At Inland Empire Criminal Defense, our PC 1320 Ontario attorney is highly experienced in dealing with such cases across Southern California, particularly in the Inland Empire region. Our legal team’s proficiency in handling hundreds of criminal cases ensures that each client receives a defense strategy that is both comprehensive and tailored to their specific situation.

Understanding the importance of immediate and accessible legal advice, we offer a free initial consultation. This opportunity allows us to assess your case thoroughly and address any questions or concerns you might have. Our commitment is to provide clear, concise, and effective legal guidance.

If you’re dealing with a failure to appear charge under PC 1320, it’s crucial to have a seasoned legal team by your side. Contact Inland Empire Criminal Defense at 909-281-0456. Our office is conveniently located in Ontario, CA, and we are dedicated to being available around the clock to support you. Trust in our expertise and dedication to safeguarding your rights and achieving the most favorable outcome in your case.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ’s)

Does the attorney offer confidential consultations?

Absolutely, Inland Empire Criminal Defense prioritizes your privacy and confidentiality. Every consultation with our attorney is conducted with the utmost discretion, ensuring your information remains secure and private.

Does the attorney offer payment plans?

Yes, understanding the financial pressures that can come with legal representation, our attorney offers flexible payment plans. This approach ensures that quality legal defense is accessible for all our clients in Riverside, San Bernardino, and Los Angeles Counties.

Is the consultation free?

Yes, Inland Empire Criminal Defense offers free consultations. This is part of our commitment to providing accessible and transparent legal services to residents of Riverside, San Bernardino, and Los Angeles Counties.

Are the consultations in person or only over the phone?

We offer both in-person and over-the-phone consultations to accommodate your preferences and needs. Whether you’re in Riverside, San Bernardino, or Los Angeles County, we ensure that you can access our legal services in the way that suits you best.

Is the office open on weekends?

Our office is typically closed on weekends. However, we do make exceptions for meetings by special arrangement. Our commitment is to be as accommodating as possible to meet the unique needs of our clients in Riverside, San Bernardino, and Los Angeles Counties.

Does the attorney serve all of California?

Our legal services are specifically tailored to residents of Riverside, San Bernardino, and Los Angeles Counties. For cases outside these areas, we recommend consulting avvo.com to find appropriate legal assistance. Our focused approach allows us to provide specialized defense catering to the unique legal landscape of these counties.

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Disclaimer: The legal information presented at this site should not be construed to be formal legal advice, nor should it be considered the formation of a lawyer or attorney-client relationship. If you would like to find out more information about your particular legal matter, contact our office for a consultation.

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